Student Learning Objectives

Students demonstrate balancingStudent Learning Objectives (SLOs) are long-term, measurable academic goals that educators set for their students. They should focus on priority content, be measured by appropriate sources of evidence, and include specific targets for student mastery or progress. They are used as a measure of student learning by all educators participating in the Educator Evaluation System.

 

RIDE is issuing an “All Call” for teacher, building administrator, and support professional SLOs and SOOs. We will use them to build a robust library of samples from various content areas and grade levels. All identifying information such as names of schools, teachers, and students will be redacted. Samples can be submitted through e-mail in Word or PDF files through December 31, to SLOsamples@ride.ri.gov. With your participation, we will all benefit from sharing our thinking and learning from one another.

  • Implementing SLOs in Rhode Island [MP4, 56MB]
    In this short video, several Rhode Island educators reflect on their experiences with the first full year of implementing SLOs in their classrooms and schools. In their own words, they describe the challenges, reflect on lessons learned, and articulate what they see as the benefits of this process. Click here for a video with subtitles.
  • Guide for Teachers Writing Student Learning Objectives [PDF, 959KB]
    This quick 2-page document represents RIDE’s current thinking on best practices for writing and revising Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) though is also applicable to those writing Student Outcome Objectives (SOOs). This document has been informed by Rhode Island educators who have shared their experience with objective writing and outlines suggested steps to the writing and revision process.
  • Indicators of a Strong SLO [PDF, 621KB]
    This document highlights the three main criteria, and corresponding elements and descriptors, included in strong SLOs. Educators may find this guide helpful as they write SLOs and evaluators may find it helpful as they review and approve SLOs.
  • Student Learning Objective Quality Check Tool [PDF, 326KB]
    A new Student Learning Objective Quality Check Tool has been developed to help educators and evaluators effectively review and revise Student Learning Objectives. The one-page tool includes guiding questions for each criteria of a Student Learning Objective (e.g., Priority of Content, Rigor of Target, Quality of Evidence) to help determine whether or not that section is acceptable or in need or revision and to help evaluators calibrate prior to approving SLOs.
  • Three Main Criteria Handout [PDF, 351KB]
    This document articulates high-level questions educators and evaluators ask themselves when considering the three main criteria of an SLO.

These samples are not intended to be exemplars, as SLOs are always context-specific. However they do illustrate characteristics of strong SLOs in their content-focus, quality of evidence, and rigor of targets.
First, we recommend reviewing several samples within your content area, both at your grade level and others. This will help you calibrate your understanding of a strong SLO.
Second, we also suggest reviewing a few samples from different disciplines as this may prompt thinking about ways to write objective statements, collect data/information, assess student learning, and tiered targets.
These samples are not meant to be adopted in their entirety. Rather, teachers could use them as a template for their SLO, but tailor them to their specific curricula, assessments, and students.

Teachers – PreK

Teachers – Elementary

Teachers – Middle School

Teachers – High School

Teachers – Special Educators

These samples are not intended to be exemplars, as SLOs are always context-specific. However they do illustrate characteristics of strong SLOs in their content-focus, quality of evidence, and rigor of targets. 

First, we recommend reviewing several samples within your content area, both at your grade level and others. This will help you calibrate your understanding of a strong SLO. 
Second, we also suggest reviewing a few samples from different disciplines as this may prompt thinking about ways to write objective statements, collect data/information, assess student learning, and tiered targets. 

These samples are not meant to be adopted in their entirety. Rather, teachers could use them as a template for their SLO, but tailor them to their specific curricula, assessments, and students.

These samples are not intended to be exemplars, as SLOs are always context-specific. However they do illustrate characteristics of strong SLOs in their content-focus, quality of evidence, and rigor of targets. 

First, we recommend reviewing several samples within your content area, both at your grade level and others. This will help you calibrate your understanding of a strong SLO. 
Second, we also suggest reviewing a few samples from different disciplines as this may prompt thinking about ways to write objective statements, collect data/information, assess student learning, and tiered targets. 

These samples are not meant to be adopted in their entirety. Rather, teachers could use them as a template for their SLO, but tailor them to their specific curricula, assessments, and students.

Elementary:

Middle School:

High School: